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MAMAC’s summer exhibition: making the modern marvellous

Martial Raysse: Soudain l'été dernier, 1963. Copyright Centre Pompidou and ADAGP, Paris, 2017 Contemporary art gallery MAMAC on Place Yves Klein is honouring Nice’s heritage in a summer exhibition directed by Jean-Jaques Aillagon and run in conjunction with the famous Centre Pompidou, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary in Paris.

The very first exhibition to open at the Centre Pompidou was a retrospective look on what’s known today as l'École de Nice, an artist movement carried by a group of artistic individuals, namely Yves Klein – master of the all things blue – and poet Claude Pascal.

The School of Nice was first formed in 1947 and some seven decades years later, their impact on Nice’s artistic landscape and influence on the art world as a whole has been phenomenal. At the opening of the exhibition in 1977 at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, museum director Pontus Hulten wrote: “Contemporary art would not have the same history without the events and encounters that took place in Nice.”

Today’s multi-sensory exhibition at the Musée d'Art Moderne et d'Art Contemporain has gathered photographs, archival documents, paintings, collages, sculptures and installations from the l'École de nice era with contributions from museums, municipal institutions and private art collectors across France and Europe, not to mention the iconic Centre Pompidou.

The influence of Yves Klein and Claude pascal brought Nice out of Paris’s shadow and into its own light. This summer (the exhibition runs until 22nd October), the MAMAC explores the charismatic personalities, niçois traditions, and the cultural and geographical specifications that all influenced and established the contemporary art movement. In 1967, Jean-Jaques Lévêque described noted: “L'École de Nice tends to define the modern as marvellous.”

The exhibition runs from 23rd June until 22nd October and entry is 8€ for adults or free for children under 18 years old and students.

www.mamac-nice.org

 

Mia Colleran